MargaretBorn in 1975, Margaret had always spoiled play between the children, and it was only the fact that she could boss her twin Andrew when Esther, her elder sister by four years, was not around which prevented a major rift between them. Jealous, when Esther later rose to stardom in Hollywood, Margaret nevertheless accepted her offer of money, and it was then she realised that men’s heads could be more easily turned and their pockets emptied if she presented an attractive front.

When aged 18, Margaret bought designer outfits three sizes smaller than her figure. She lost two stones in weight so that she could fit into them, and had her soft blonde hair cut short. Her transformation from slut to business woman was complete. Then, she turned her charms on Roger Colet, the owner of the bingo hall her mother Joan had so often frequented. On the pretence of doing a survey on the buying habits of men, and wearing a smart avocado green jacket and knee-length skirt and matching shoes, with a buttermilk-cream coloured blouse, Margaret waited outside the bingo hall with a clipboard until she could meet him. Having taken the details of his name, marital status, he was married, she then dropped her clipboard. Assuming that Roger would bend down to retrieve it for her, Margaret made sure that her hand rested on his shoulder as he did so.

Roger’s eyes were drawn to the deliciously mysterious space between Margaret’s breasts, gently rising and falling with each breath she took. The soft flow of exhaled air caressed his face. He turned to see Margaret’s slightly moist lips, a matter of inches from his. The lips parted. Got him, she thought. “Thank you, Mister Colet,” she purred. “You’re a fit man, and much more attractive than the young men who make passes at me.” Margaret slid her hand down Roger’s fingers and picked up the clipboard, saying, “If only a real man would ask me out.” He was hooked.

When Roger was completely besotted with her, Margaret turned the screw. First, she got the manager of the bingo hall the sack. Then she began to siphon off the profits. When the reduction showed up in the accounts, she fiddled the attendance figures, convincing Roger that the age of the bingo hall was almost at an end. His wife was no problem; Margaret simply made a friend of her.

Choosing a sudden lapse in Roger’s health as her moment to broach the subject, Margaret suggested it was about time the couple spent more time together. “You could make me a partner, and retire to sunnier climes,” she said. “You could buy a villa in Spain, and I’ll send your share of the profits to you every month.” Roger and his wife agreed, but neglected to read the small print in the agreement Margaret’s solicitor drew up. When the company went bankrupt six months later, they found Margaret had a controlling interest and was the main creditor. This meant that she could accept offers for the business.

Eventually, Roger and his wife accepted Margaret’s offer of £10,000 in settlement. She took full responsibility, of course. She had, she said, been unable to stem the outflow of customers, who preferred the video-machine arcades. Margaret was now sole owner and knew exactly where she was going. She applied for planning permission to turn the bingo hall into Margate’s first casino. After her application was passed, with the help of cash sweeteners to the most influential members of the Planning Committee, she applied for a licence. She easily got that too and after a month’s closure for renovation the place was re-opened as a casino. Margaret was on her way, and no one knew she owned the place. Then she planned her next move… it would be on Esther, her sister…

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